Sculpture by the Sea Bondi 2015: part 01

I finally visited Sculpture by the Sea Bondi for the first time and I’m not sure if I could have been more excited. I decided to go backwards from the usual Bondi to Tamarama walk, and started at Tamarama Beach instead. It was a cloudy and windy day (at one point, I almost got blown over by a sudden gust of wind) and packed full of people. But despite that, I had a great time and am glad I made the effort to see this outdoor art exhibition. I didn’t manage to see all 107 works on display, but I managed to see most of them and thought I’d share some of my favourites.

Pig of Fortune #2, by Tae Geun Yang

Statement: since the pig is a much loved symbol of fortune and fecundity, the artist endeavours to exhibit the coexistence between humans and animals.

What was great about this sculpture was that it allowed kids (and kids at heart) to run through the pig, since it was made like a tunnel. It reminded me of my primary school days where I used to play hide and seek or stuck in the mud around this giant pipe/tunnel in the playground, and eventually growing big enough to climb on top (I did not attempt that with this sculpture).

Bayanihan Hopping Spirit House

Bayanihan Hopping Spirit House, by Alwin Reamillo

Statement: built in Sydney’s west, the migration of this ‘hopping’ hut, made from found materials, is a reminder of the resilience of people displaced by natural disasters.

Bayanihan Hopping Spirit House, by Alwin Reamillo

Bayanihan Hopping Spirit House, by Alwin Reamillo

Such an interesting and impressive structure. So many tin cans were turned into windchimes, which were fluttering about in the wind. While it was beautiful, to me it was a reminder of how much junk we have and carelessly throw away. But, perhaps as they say, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

Tidal Pools #3, by Elaine Miles

Tidal Pools #3, by Elaine Miles

Statement: handcrafted delicate sculptural forms in glass, inspired by underwater coral, urchins and sea creatures.

Tidal Pools #3, by Elaine Miles

Tidal Pools #3, by Elaine Miles

Meteorite, by Jina Lee

Meteorite, by Jina Lee

Statement: the work represents all forms of life as a meteorite that has landed on the earth and as it grows, it adapts to its new environment.

Meteorite, by Jina Lee

Meteorite, by Jina Lee

Maybe because I have a soft spot for plants growing in odd places, I really felt drawn to this meteorite. I also secretly want this meteorite in my house, but at AU$19,000 it is a little out of my price range…

The Bottles, by RCM Collective

The Bottles, by RCM Collective

Statement: a sculptural portrait of human-sized  ‘Spray and Wipe’ cleaning agents becoming marine life. The work animates a disconnection between consumer waste and the natural environment.

These bottles actually worked! I’m not sure on the magic of how, but everyone wanted to have a go at pushing the trigger. Definitely a fun and interactive sculpture. And while I didn’t get sprayed directly, I did catch some of the ‘splashback’.

Wave 2, by Annette Thas

Wave 2, by Annette Thas

Statement: we all have our own childhood memories coming towards us at different times in our lives. Do you go with the flow or dive through?

Wave 2, by Annette Thas

Wave 2, by Annette Thas

Wave 2, by Annette Thas

Wave 2, by Annette Thas

This disturbingly-pieced-together sculpture certainly seemed to divide people. From what I overheard, you either loved it or hated it. I personally loved it, and I can’t quite figure out why. I mean, I never grew up with a Barbie doll nor do I recall ever wanting one. Yet, there is just something about this that I really like.

Transmigration, by Jeremy Sheehan

Transmigration, by Jeremy Sheehan

Statement: made on many diverse islands along their flyway, these “mutton birds” have bones of found ocean plastic, covered with materials that will breakdown to expose their permanent skeleton.

Transmigration, by Jeremy Sheehan

Transmigration, by Jeremy Sheehan

These ‘birds’ were both recognisable and unrecognisable in their Frankenstein form. There were about 20 of them sat along the fence, and it was a sad reminder of how plastics impact upon sealife. I’m not sure how these ‘birds’ survived the great blasts of wind trying to knock them off their perch, but there they sat.

Crouching Man, by Laurence Edwards

Crouching Man, by Laurence Edwards

Statement: the third figure in a series, each one exploring a different psyche. This one watches a world passing by.

There’s still a lot more to see ahead, but I think we’ll stop here for now. Perhaps we can take a break with Crouching Man and watch the world pass by…

2 thoughts on “Sculpture by the Sea Bondi 2015: part 01

  1. Lignum Draco says:

    I could sense your excitement at being there for the first time, Sandy. 🙂
    I remember saying to someone I felt freaked out by the barbie dolls, yet I liked the sculpture. I’m sure you could craft your own meteorite at home. Looking forward to Part 2.

    Like

    • Sandy says:

      Perhaps too excited! XD The Barbie doll wave was definitely fascinating. Also, if you could loan me $19,000 for the meteorite, that’d be much appreciated 😉

      Like

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